My review: The old you, by Louise Voss

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About the book:

Nail-bitingly modern domestic noir
A tense, Hitchcockian psychological thriller
Louise Voss returns with her darkest, most chilling, novel yet…

Lynn Naismith gave up the job she loved when she married Ed, the love of her life, but it was worth it for the happy years they enjoyed together. Now, ten years on, Ed has been diagnosed with early-onset dementia, and things start to happen; things more sinister than missing keys and lost words. As some memories are forgotten, others, long buried, begin to surface… and Lynn’s perfect world begins to crumble.

But is it Ed s mind playing tricks, or hers…?

My review:

I have finished this book a while ago, but only now got time to write about it.

Everything about this book is excellent! Beautiful language, captivating thrilling plot, interesting characters, plenty of twists and turns.

I absolutely loved it! For a while I haven’t read a plot that even slightly doesn’t remind me anything I’ve read and seen before.

Lynn’s character is likeable, even despite lack of self-respect and little naivety but it makes it even more real. I absolutely enjoyed all the twists in the book and couldn’t put it down until I finished.

It’s one of those books that kept me reading at nights, because I coudn’t stop.

It is the first solo book by Louise Voss which I have read and she has jumped onto my list of must-read authors straight away. I quite enjoyed their collaboration with another favourite Mark Edwards, so I was keen to give Louise’s books my full attention. I am so glad I started with ‘The old you’!

Without giving away anything, this book is a massive page-turner and great a psychological thriller that you will truly enjoy.

My score is 5* out of 5*.

Books on the train: A man called Ove, by Fredrik Backman

About the book:

There is something about Ove.At first sight, he is almost certainly the grumpiest man you will ever meet. He thinks himself surrounded by idiots – neighbours who can’t reverse a trailer properly, joggers, shop assistants who talk in code, and the perpetrators of the vicious coup d’etat that ousted him as Chairman of the Residents’ Association. He will persist in making his daily inspection rounds of the local streets.But isn’t it rare, these days, to find such old-fashioned clarity of belief and deed? Such unswerving conviction about what the world should be, and a lifelong dedication to making it just so?In the end, you will see, there is something about Ove that is quite irresistible…

The word-of-mouth bestseller causing a sensation across Europe, Fredrik Backman’s heartwarming debut is a funny, moving, uplifting tale of love and community that will leave you with a spring in your step – and less ready to judge on first impressions a man you might one day wish to have as your dearest friend.

My review: The Water Cure, by Sophie Mackintosh

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About the book:

Imagine a world very close to our own: where women are not safe in their bodies, where desperate measures are required to raise a daughter. This is the story of Grace, Lia and Sky, kept apart from the world for their own good and taught the terrible things that every woman must learn about love. And it is the story of the men who come to find them – three strangers washed up by the sea, their gazes hungry and insistent, trailing desire and destruction in their wake.

Hypnotic and compulsive, The Water Cure is a fever dream, a blazing vision of suffering, sisterhood and transformation.

My review:

I found this book had so much potential as it pictures an interesting version of dystopia. As a fan of dystopian books, I was hoping the idea will develop further, but unfortunately there are too many questions and not many answers. I suppose the author wanted to give a reader an open space for imagination and to be able to come to our own conclusions.

I was struggling for a good half of the book but kept pursuing. When the men arrived to the island, things started to progress but it came to a disappointing end. I can’t call it an end as well and don’t really see a reason to leave the story at that point. Is it going to be the second book after this?

As I mentioned, the concept of the story is quite interesting and at some places thought-provoking, but the plot hasn’t progressed to anything and really hasn’t given any reasons, answers or meanings.

My score is 2* out of 5*.