My review: The light we lost, by Jill Santopolo

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About the book:

He was the first person to inspire her, to move her, to truly understand her. Was he meant to be the last?

Lucy is faced with a life-altering choice. But before she can make her decision, she must start her story—their story—at the very beginning.

Lucy and Gabe meet as seniors at Columbia University on a day that changes both of their lives forever. Together, they decide they want their lives to mean something, to matter. When they meet again a year later, it seems fated—perhaps they’ll find life’s meaning in each other. But then Gabe becomes a photojournalist assigned to the Middle East and Lucy pursues a career in New York. What follows is a thirteen-year journey of dreams, desires, jealousies, betrayals, and, ultimately, of love. Was it fate that brought them together? Is it choice that has kept them away? Their journey takes Lucy and Gabe continents apart, but never out of each other’s hearts.

My review:

As much as I loved the writing and the beginning of this novel, I disliked the main characters and their ‘love’ story. I very much enjoyed the structure of the novel, the story-telling side and the language.

It was one of the fastest reads – in three days and inbetween work, home responsibilities and fitness. To be honest, I don’t know what I expected from this story. The interesting thing is that the selfish behaviour that both Lucy and Gabe had is quite realistic. So many people do exactly what they did – taking people who love them for granted, betray trust, waste other people’s time… These are the things that I absolutely despise in a relationship, in love. To me it’s not love. 

Unfortunately, the author and I have different views on what true love is. And it’s ok. For this same reason I couldn’t sympatise selfish and self-centred Lucy. I didn’t believe in her love for Darren, I didn’t believe in her poor attempts to show it was also love. To me it looked like she was doing him a favour staying in the relationship, just because she was scared she would have stayed alone if she chose Gabe at any point of those 13 years. And everything what she could give to this amazing man Darren who loved her with all his heart, was patient, caring, kind and forever understanding was that ‘half-arsed’ happiness she gave him. I honestly feel sorry for the guy.

At some stage the ending became quite predictable. On the other hand, I would love to know what will happen after all these events. That’s where the real story can actually start. 

Sometimes I think I disliked the story because it is so real and parts of it happened in every woman’s life. The scary thing what this book made me do was to check out on my ex-boyfriend who I had similar obsession with. I recognised this behavior in Lucy’s regular ‘scanning’ of Gabe’s life through social media. I think she was lying to herself saying that she didn’t care or wasn’t interested.

It all makes you think only about emotional side of the relationship, about some memories that at this current moment don’t have any value. Time that makes you forget all bad things and forgive mixes up to this dangerous cocktail. I am not saying people shouldn’t forgive, I am saying people probably shouldn’t forget. What is worth of your love and attention. What you can give and give to a person who really loves you, not out of boredom or some illusions. Sometimes you just need to make the right decision – follow your heart no matter what, but not at the expense of other people’s feelings and time.

My score is 3* out of 5*.

My review: The Night Market, by Jonathan Moore

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About the book:

From an author who consistently gives us “suspense that never stops” (James Patterson), a near-future thriller that makes your most paranoid fantasies seem like child’s play.

It’s late Thursday night, and Inspector Ross Carver is at a crime scene in one of the city’s last luxury homes. The dead man on the floor is covered by an unknown substance that’s eating through his skin. Before Carver can identify it, six FBI agents burst in and remove him from the premises. He’s pushed into a disinfectant trailer, forced to drink a liquid that sends him into seizures, and is shocked unconscious. On Sunday he wakes in his bed to find his neighbor, Mia—who he’s barely ever spoken to—reading aloud to him. He can’t remember the crime scene or how he got home; he has no idea two days have passed. Mia says she saw him being carried into their building by plainclothes police officers, who told her he’d been poisoned. Carver doesn’t really know this woman and has no way of disproving her, but his gut says to keep her close.

A mind-bending, masterfully plotted thriller—written in Moore’s “lush, intoxicating style” (Justin Cronin)—that will captivate fans of Blake Crouch, China Miéville, and Lauren Beukes, The Night Market follows Carver as he works to find out what happened to him, soon realizing he’s entangled in a web of conspiracy that spans the nation. And that Mia may know a lot more than she lets on.

My review:

This book provided so much promise at the start that I felt a bit disappointed in the end. The storyline, its science fiction/dystopian part, is absolutely fascinating. This area had so much potential that I got my hopes up. The mystery part was exciting as well but the ending wasn’t quite there for me.

Ross Carver is a great character and I felt strongly connected to him. He is a great detective, great friend you can always trust. Mia, on a contrary, made me dislike her from the start. Maybe it’s just me but I found everything she was saying or doing absolutely hideous. Not that I didn’t believe her but how she did it (or the author did for her). If Jonathan had an intention of creating a love story, then for me personally it failed.

The other thing I didn’t quite like is a title. I don’t really get why it’s called ‘The Night Market’….If you get, can you please help?

Despite the stated dislikes, I quite enjoyed the story and how it was going. I’m an absolute sucker for dystopias. The more the better. This one also about really interesting society created on consumerism and advertising technologies which are great topics to explore. As I said it can be so much more in that. This was my favourite aspect of ‘The Night Market’.

I was also disappointed to find out in the end that it’s the third book in a series. It can be read as a standalone novel but now I keep guessing how much connection it had to other books.

This book is one of those to enjoy the process but not the ending. I score it 4* out of 5*.