My review: The Murder of Magpies, by Mark Edwards


About the book:

The terrifying sequel to the #1 bestseller The Magpies.

Five years ago Jamie Knight lost everything: his home, his wife and their unborn child. But at least the woman responsible, ‘Dark Angel’ Lucy Newton, was in prison, and slowly Jamie was able to rebuild his life.

But now Lucy has been freed on appeal, and before long Jamie receives a message from a desperate stranger. Lucy is up to her old tricks—ruining lives for fun.

Jamie agrees to help. But once again, he has no idea what he is getting himself into…

My review:

Mark Edwards is one of my favourite authors, and of course, ‘The Magpies’ is one of my favourite thrillers. With no doubt I couldn’t miss a little sequel to ‘The Magpies’. So, before reading it, take a look at the first book first.

I would call this novella ‘short and sweet’. It doesn’t take long to read it, but it has everything for a successful thriller: suspense, drama and a cliffhanger.

I think ‘The Murder of Magpies’ is about many things: it’s about revenge and desire to make everything right, it’s about love and what you can do for it and it’s about letting go. Probably the last was impossible for Jamie. But can you blame him after what he and Kirsty have been through?

The story is absolutely crazy which makes it even more interesting. I actually was craving for more, so it was almost a torture to finish the book so quickly.

There definitely should be the third book that I am looking forward to already, as I enjoyed the first novel and a sequel novella.

My score is 4* out of 5*, just because I would’ve really loved this book to be longer.





My review: The Rules of Magic, by Alice Hoffman


About the book:

Find your magic

For the Owens family, love is a curse that began in 1620, when Maria Owens was charged with witchery for loving the wrong man.

Hundreds of years later, in New York City at the cusp of the sixties, when the whole world is about to change, Susanna Owens knows that her three children are dangerously unique. Difficult Franny, with skin as pale as milk and blood red hair, shy and beautiful Jet, who can read other people’s thoughts, and charismatic Vincent, who began looking for trouble on the day he could walk.

From the start Susanna sets down rules for her children: No walking in the moonlight, no red shoes, no wearing black, no cats, no crows, no candles, no books about magic. And most importantly, never, ever, fall in love. But when her children visit their Aunt Isabelle, in the small Massachusetts town where the Owens family has been blamed for everything that has ever gone wrong, they uncover family secrets and begin to understand the truth of who they are. Back in New York City each begins a risky journey as they try to escape the family curse.

The Owens children cannot escape love even if they try, just as they cannot escape the pains of the human heart. The two beautiful sisters will grow up to be the revered, and sometimes feared, aunts in Practical Magic, while Vincent, their beloved brother, will leave an unexpected legacy.

My review:

This book is just magical. I felt so much interested in the lives of Franny, Jet and Vincent that was extremely sad when the book came to an end.

‘The Rules of Magic’ is a fairytale for adults who still want to believe in magic, curses, destinies and that love can conquer all. Set in the 1960s really gives a special charisma to everything that was happening in the book. The free spirit of that time, fashionable and modern New York and the opposite of it all where it all started – in Massachusetts, in the old house full of secrets and exotic plants. 

‘The Rules of Magic’ will give you so many rules that will help to define your own destiny. It teaches you kindness, love and that you always have to be yourself.

The world of ‘The Rules of Magic’ is full of wonder, wisdom and stories that will make you laugh, cry, think, love, hate, exhale and inhale again. It’s been a few days since I finished the book and I miss it all so much.You don’t need to believe in magic and witchery to like this book. It tells stories that will make you care about the Owens and what will happen to them.

Despite it being the second book in a series, it can be a stand-alone novel. I haven’t read the first book – ‘The Practical Magic’ but definitely will.

My score is 5* out of 5*.



Books on the Train: Sympathy, by Olivia Sudjic


About the book:

An electrifying debut novel of obsessive love, family secrets, and the dangers of living our lives online

At twenty-three, Alice Hare leaves England for New York. She becomes fixated on Mizuko Himura, a Japanese writer living in New York, whose life story has strange parallels to her own and whom she believes is her “internet twin.” What seems to Mizuko like a chance encounter with Alice is anything but—after all, in the age of connectivity, nothing is coincidence. Their subsequent relationship is doomed from the outset, exposing a tangle of lies and sexual encounters as three families across the globe collide, and the most ancient of questions—where do we come from—is answered just by searching online.   In its heady evocation of everything from Haruki Murakami to Patricia Highsmith to Edith Wharton, Sympathy is utterly original—a thrilling tale of obsession, doubling, blood ties, and our tormented efforts to connect in the digital age.